Corporate Elite gather to "debate" Net Neutrality.

Originally posted to facebook: (Comments copied for archival) 

On February 7 and 8, the corporate elite of Canada will get together to discuss the future of the internet, your privacy and most importantly Net Neutrality.

The 9th annual privacy and security conference in Victoria will be priced at $550 a head. You wont find activists, democratic media interests, consumer groups or well pretty much anyone who matters... what you will find is a group of corporate sponsors, lead by Bell and Rogers, who are heavily targeting the public sector in an effort to back-door lobby.

The kick-back? Reduced admission fees for government employees. They get in for $325 of your tax dollars. How generous.

As one of the forefront activists in Canada on Net Neutrality, I find it even more telling that not even a single member of the panel can be found on my contact list. What you will find is mainstream players from the major telecoms. In fact, bell seems to be a platinum sponsor. http://www.rebootconference.com/privacy2008/sponsor.php ...

With this targeting of government regulators, the sponsorship by telecoms and the exclusion of independent voices, it should be pretty clear what the message will be at the end of the day. Net Neutrality the false dichotomy between the Telecoms and Google.

They've even titled the event as so "Who Should Spin the Web?: Free Market Versus Net Neutrality"....

http://www.rebootconference.com/privacy2008/agenda.php

What a joke.

 

 Daniel Quinn at 12:33am January 3
This may sound naive, but what's to stop people like you and I from showing up anyway?

 Kevin McArthur at 1:48am January 3
$550 =P

 Steve Anderson at 8:02pm January 3
hmm... it would be good if some public interest folks could make there way in and disrupt this. Victoria is pretty isolated thought, and $550 is a major barrier.

 Kevin McArthur at 10:05pm February 7
Update: My spy in the event has reported in. I'm told Andrew Clement is representing the neutrality side (though outnumbered) -- and doing an excellent job. The usual corporate message is being eschewed, and retorts will be necessary.

For my neutrality friends reading this; this would be a good week to turn up the net neutrality reporting, and make sure that our message of source destination and content non-interference gets out there.